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Moodle on a Raspberry Pi 2 - moopi.mrverrall.co.uk

I've occasionally wondered if it was at all practical to run a small functional Moodle site using just a Raspberry Pi and whenever I've been half tempted to try I've came to the swift conclusion that the answer was most likely 'No'; and I think this is still probably the case today.

We are now however in the brave new era of the Raspberry Pi 2 where we have more cpus and RAM to play with, and after my friend Moodle Fairy asked if it was at all possible or indeed worthwhile to do such a thing I decided it was time to give it a real shot and put to task my experience in optimising Moodle at work hosting a Moodle site on the decidedly lightweight Pi 2.

So what is the answer? Can you run a useful Moodle on a raspberry Pi 2? Well, yes you can! And not only that I have been rather impressed with the sites overall performance which has exceed all reasonable expectations. Your average page load time is well under a second.

Rather than go into more details here, I'll save that for the wee Pi itself, which for at least a short while, will play host to moopi.mrverrall.co.uk along side some helpful information about how it's all set up.

Go on, go have a play :)

Comments

  1. Hi. I tried to send an email with this question, but it got bounced back to me. It says email address is disabled.

    I have been playing around with Moodle for a while. I tried out MoodleBox on my RPI3 and it was super easy to test out.....just installed the image. Unfortunately it seems sluggish.....

    I saw your page and how to setup MooPi and was wondering if you offer a image of an already setup system? Otherwise...I'll try the steps you have outlined.

    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete

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